Ben Tate

Submitted by on Oct 12, 2015

Duke Ellington Johnny Hodges Duke Ellington Johnny Hodges Jazz Video Johnny Hodges Johnny Hodges owner of the most beautiful sound ever sounding jazz. Alto saxophonist Johnny Hodges created his own style of early musical career. Johnny Hodges Although Johnny Hodges stompovat could swing with the best performers and has been master of the blues. Johnny Hodges juicy game Johnny Hodges in the performance of ballads has never been surpassed by no one. First soloist in the orchestra of Duke Ellington for almost 4 decades, Johnny Hodges was the most influential alto saxophonist until the jazz scene of Charlie Parker. Johnny Hodges In fact, Johnny Hodges was self-taught. He played the piano and drums before being started playing soprano – saxophone at the age of 14 years. Johnny Hodges First musical idol Johnny Hodges was Sidney Bechet. although he soon made ​​the alto saxophone his main instrument. His early experience (1924) included the game with Lloyd Scott. Chick Webb, Lloyd Scott, Chick Webb, Luckey Roberts and Willie “The Lion”Smith ), Johnny Hodges Lucky Roberts and Willie”the Lion”Smith (Lloyd Scott, Chick Webb, Luckey Roberts and Willie”The Lion”Smith), Johnny Hodges also had the opportunity to work with Sidney Bechet. However, the real Johnny Hodges’ career began in 1928, when he joined the Duke Ellington Orchestra. He quickly became a major solo star in the orchestra and the best alto – saxophonist of the time; Benny Carter was able to closely compete with them only in the 30s. Johnny Hodges Johnny Hodges participated in countless performances with Ellington and also had many opportunities to lead their own projects with the orchestra of Duke. Things Ain’t What They Used to Be ,””Come Sunday”Passion Flower “, Johnny Hodges Was it the album “Things Is not What They Used to Be,””Come Sunday”or”Passion Flower”, Johnny Hodges has always been an indispensable participant Ellington Orchestra in the 30s and 40s. His decision to leave the Duke in 1951 and set up his own ensemble caused a shock in the jazz world. From 1951 to 1955 GG he led his orchestra. which briefly played John Coltrane. Johnny Hodges Castle Rock “, Johnny Hodges quickly recorded his first hit “Castle Rock”, a few albums for Norman Granz. including a jam session in 1952 with Benny Carter and Charlie Parker. but in 1955 he broke up the combo. Johnny Hodges Return of Johnny Hodges Duke Ellington was a joyful event in the future, he practically never left the band. Johnny Hodges Wild Bill Davis . In the 60s Johnny Hodges spoke at several sessions with organist Wild Bill Davis. which then became a member at the time of the Ellington orchestra (1969). Johnny Hodges. Johnny Hodges. whose unfailing performance style has always gravitated toward a fresh sound, he remained with Ellington until his sudden death in 1970. After his death, Ellington said: “Our orchestra will never sound as before.” Duke Ellington. Billy Strayhorn . Irving Mills . Mercer Ellington . George Gershwin . Paul Francis Webster . Ira Gershwin . Jimmy McHugh . Dorothy Fields, Juan Tizol, Johnny Mercer, WC Handy, Henry Nemo, Mitchell Parish, Paul Mills, Spencer Williams, Bob Russell, John Redmond, Ray Noble Harry Carney . Lawrence Brown, Cootie Williams, Jimmy Hamilton, Sonny Greer, Ray Nance, Russell Procope, Fred Guy, Barney Bigard, Cat Anderson, Paul Gonsalves, Juan Tizol, Sam Woodyard, Rex Stewart, Billy Strayhorn, Tricky Sam Nanton, Wellman Braud, Duke Ellington & His Orchestra, Arthur Whetsol Performed compositions authors: Duke Ellington. Billy Strayhorn. Irving Mills. Mercer Ellington. George Gershwin. Paul Francis Webster. Ira Gershwin. Jimmy McHugh. Dorothy Fields, Juan Tizol, Johnny Mercer, WC Handy, Henry Nemo, Mitchell Parish, Paul Mills, Spencer Williams, Bob Russell, John Redmond, Ray Noble worked with musicians. Harry Carney. Lawrence Brown, Cootie Williams, Jimmy Hamilton, Sonny Greer, Ray Nance, Russell Procope, Fred Guy, Barney Bigard, Cat Anderson, Paul Gonsalves, Juan Tizol , Sam Woodyard, Rex Stewart, Billy Strayhorn, Tricky Sam Nanton, Wellman Braud, Duke Ellington & His Orchestra, Arthur Whetsol
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