Alan Watts

Submitted by on Oct 7, 2015

106 Readers 106 13 February 92 1 Born: January 6, 1915 Chislehurst Died: November 16th, 1973 Mount Tamalpais, Sausalito, California Watts was born in 1915 in the town of Chizelherst, Kent, England, in a family with an average income. Michelin, His father was a representative of the company Michelin, and his mother – a housewife. His mother came from a family missionary. Because of modest means, the family chose to live in the countryside, and Alan, only child, grew up in nature, since childhood knowing by heart the names of all the plants and insects. Perhaps due to the influence of a deeply religious mother’s family, born interest in the study of fundamental principles of anything. Alan also loved to read fiction, especially romantic stories about the mysterious Far East. King’s School, Watts attended the King’s School, which was close to Canterbury Cathedral. Despite the good performance, especially in the scholastic and the good reputation of the school, Watts missed the opportunity to go to Oxford. Examiners found his introductory essay bold and divisive. So after graduation Watts immediately went to work, first in the printing press, and later – to the bank. He spent his spare time in the Buddhist community, trained by “false gurus”who calls himself Dimitri Mitrinovichem (Mitrinovich called himself a follower of Peter Assumption, George Gurdjieff and some psychoanalytic schools of Freud, Jung and Adler). Watts also many studied philosophy, history, psychology, psychiatry and Eastern wisdom. London gave him a lot of other opportunities for personal growth. After Humphrey, he met with prominent esoteric writers (such as Nicholas Roerich and Sarvapali Radhakrishnan) and bright theosophists like Alice Bailey. In 1936, at age 21, he attended the World Congress of the Faith in the University of London, listening to a report Daysetsu Suzuki, and later was able to communicate with and respected scholar of the school of Zen. As a result of interviews and casual acquaintances, he became interested in studying the available scientific literature, the basic concepts and terminology of the basic philosophical trends in India and East Asia. In 1936 it was published the first book of Watts,”The Spirit of Zen”, which was later recognized as a reinterpretation of written Suzuki. In 1938, he and his bride left England and settled in America. He married Eleanor Everett, whose mother, Ruth Fuller Everett, has been associated with Zen Buddhist circles of the USA. A few years later, Ruth married the Zen master Sokey en Sasaki, and this Japanese gentleman served as a kind of role model and teacher Alan Watts, though never officially became a disciple of Sasaki. Watts gave up formal training in Zen in New York due to the fact that the teaching methods are not well suited to it. He was ordained a Buddhist monk, but he felt that he needed to transfer the accumulated professional philosophical knowledge. Seabury-Western Theological Seminary, He entered the Anglican (Episcopalian) school (Seabury-Western Theological Seminary, Evanston, Illinois), where he studied sculpture christian, theology, and church history. In the spring of 1951 Watts moved to California, where he found work at the California Institute of Integral Studies in San Francisco. In the mid-1950s, having stayed a few years the head of the institute, Watts left teaching. Pacifica Since 1953, he led a weekly show on Radio Pacifica in Berkeley until his death in 1973. Since the station has been a non-profit, for that Watts had not received the money, but he was collecting a large audience among the residents of San Francisco Bay Area. Pacifica These transmissions subsequently broadcasts additional stations Pacifica in other regions and aired repeatedly even after his death. After returning to the United States, Watts began experimenting with taking psychedelics. The first experiment – mescaline, which he gave Dr. Oscar Dzhaniger. Watts took LSD a few times with different research teams led by Dr. Keith Dittmann, Dr. Sterling Bunnela and Dr. Michael Agron. He also tried marijuana, noting it as useful and interesting psychoactive substance that gives the illusion of time dilation. Watts In the books written in the 60s, was influenced by similar chemical experiments on the point of view of the writer. Later, he commented on the use of drugs, “When you got the message, do not forget to hang up.” References * 1936 Spirit of Zen * 1940 The value of happiness * 1944 Mystical Theology of St. Dionysius (translated from the Greek pseudo-Dionysius) * 1974 The essence of Alan Watts * 1975 Tao: The course, co-authored with Al Chung-Liang Huang
Alan WattsAlan Watts
Alan WattsAlan Watts
Alan WattsAlan Watts

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