Howard Johnson

Submitted by on Oct 13, 2015

11.02.2010 Howard Johnson (Howard Johnson)

Howard Johnson (Howard Johnson) – was born August 7, 1941, Montgomery (Alabama), USA. Outstanding post jazz musician and composer. First of all, he is known as a performer of the tuba and baritone saxophone.

Howard Johnson grew up in a small town near Cleveland (Ohio) With 11 years he began to play the baritone saxophone in the school orchestra, and later the tuba. During his service in the Navy United States, he learned to play the clarinet and alto saxophone, which he subsequently true professional uses. When prompted by Eric Dolphy in 1963, he moved to New York City, where he entered into contact with the musical life of New York.

The first record Howard Johnson done as a baritone saxophone with Bill Dixon and Hank Crawford. In 1965 he played in the orchestra at Charles Mingus / Chrles Mingus, and in 1966 – in the orchestra Archie Shepp / Archie Shepp, with whom he recorded his album “Mama Too Tight”.

Gradually Howard Johnson is not only orchestral musician and soloist. He played in the orchestras of Josephine Baker and Marvin Gaye, is working with the legendary Duke Ellington Orchestra / Duke Ellington. Takes part in a group of four tubes rock band blues singer Taj Mahal / Taj Mahal. Voice tubes Howard Johnson loves the Taj Mahal and is regularly invited him to record their albums. Albums of the Howard Johnson’s need to listen to, first wonder what can tuba, which is the original instrument – and then implicitly captures the music.

Since 1966, Howard Johnson played in a variety of formulations Gil Evans Orchestra / Gil Evans, for example “Monday Night Orchetra”(recorded 1973″Svengali”), with whom he also made a European tour in 1974 and recorded an album “There Comes a Time” (1975).

He was also a member of Jazz Composer & rsquo; s Orchestra and performed with Gato Barbieri. In 1967, Howard Johnson lived a short time in Los Angeles and in the same place in the orchestras of Oliver Nelson and Quincy Jones.

Returning again to New York in 1969godu, it was a short time member of the orchestra Thad Jones / Mel Lewis, and Charlie Hadens / Liberation Musik Orchestra. Since 1970 participated in the recording of rock and blues musicians such as John Lennon / John Lennon “The Band”(Rock of Ages, The Last Waltz 1971) and the king of the blues BB King / BBKing. Since 1975 he worked as an arranger for various New York bands. In 1972, Howard Johnson became a soloist in the concert” Chrles Mingus and Friends in Conzert & raquo ;. Since 1976 – member of George Gruntz Conzert Jazz Band, then – Peter Herbolzheimers Gala – All Stars Band.

In 1977, the Howard Johnson founded his own ensemble of 6 tubes “Graviti”(Seriously), such as a tuba player Dave Bargeron, Bob Stewart, Tom Malone. Initially, the popularity of this unusual band was low, and only in 1996 they noticed a giant sound recording”Verve”and provided an opportunity to make the first record. A notable success was the team to”Monterey Jazz Festival”.

In 1985, Johnson toured the jazz festival in Berlin Baritonsaxophonisten-All Star-Ensemble. In the same year he participated with George Gruntz in scenic oratorios “The Holy Grail of Jazz” Graz (Austria). In the early ’90s Howard Johnson lived one year in Hamburg, playing big band NDR and participated in recordings with musicians such as George Gruntz, Miles Davis, Quinsy Jones, John Scofield, Barbara Dennerlein and others.

The merit of the Howard Johnson that he, along with Bob Stewart / Bob Stewart made from tuba accompanying instrument recognized solo instrument. On this occasion he speaks so: “that tube should be fun, really bad: it or ugly or loud. The only reason why tuba has a bad reputation, is that it is bad play & raquo ;. According to surveys of the leading magazines”Down Beat”and”Jazz Forum”c mid 70s Howard Johnson / Howard Johnson took the lead in the category of” Various tools & raquo ;, displacing those of Roland Kirk.

translation Vadim Polle

discography:

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